working with dreams-002

  • Dream related Korean Culture

www.DreamAuction.org

DREAM AUCTION | DREAM RITUAL is an art project inspired by Korean Culture that deals with dreams. 


DREAM RITUAL 03–06 Jul 2019 The Coronet Theatre​, Notting Hill, London

In Korea, discussing dreams and interpreting their meaning amongst friends and family is a popular way of identifying symbols that can shed light on the events in a person’s future. Oftentimes, dreams containing particularly desirable elements are informally “sold”, transferring energy or a state of mind from one close connection to another. In the West, dream psychology is a popular method of self-reflection, considering the presence of people and situations in dreams as signals for a suppressed or hidden subconsciousness. In the vernacular of daily conversation within both cultures, discussing dreams is a form of facilitating personal reflection. People investigate and decipher dreams together, discussing an individual’s personal desires or anxieties without directly forcing a discussion of one person’s personal issues. Despite the varying practices surrounding dreams in Korea and the West, there is a clear and active desire within contemporary cultures to look at dreams as revelatory and containing a certain social value. The artist Bongsu Park has been exploring this concept as a point of departure for an ongoing series of works that have spanned performance, video, sound composition, and social exchanges. Through her work looking deep into this topic from different frames of reference, she will bring together diverse audiences to consider the ways that dreams hold relevance in our everyday lives.

Bongsu Park is a London-based Korean artist. She studied at the Slade School of Fine Arts, UK and at l’Ecole des Beaux-Arts de Bordeaux, France. Her recent work is founded on how our innermost thoughts may connect with other people’s and how these can be shared publicly. Her work finds its roots in the philosophy of her homeland South Korea and brings this into the context of contemporary western societies.

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